Author Archives: Giorgio Bertini

About Giorgio Bertini

Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++

Why Kids Need Wilderness And Adventure More Than Ever

These days, our kids’ lives are overscheduled, filled with pressure, and can be pretty intense. School, homework, sports and/or other extracurricular activities fill the week and often consumes many weekends as well. We all can feel like there is no … Continue reading

Posted in Children, Nature | Tagged ,

Lessons Learned from Centuries of Indigenous Forest Management

Over centuries, even millennia, indigenous communities have developed interdependent systems of agriculture and forestry that are uniquely suited to the ecological requirements of the land they inhabit. Yet even today says Charles M. Peters, a curator of Botany at the … Continue reading

Posted in Forest, Indigenous communities, Indigenous knowledge, Indigenous practice | Tagged , , ,

Why Brazil’s New President Poses an Unprecedented Threat to the Amazon

For people concerned about the environment and climate change, U.S. President Donald Trump has proven to be as bad, or worse, than feared. He is in the process of pulling the United States out of the Paris Agreement, continues to … Continue reading

Posted in Amazon, Indigenous knowledge, Indigenous peoples | Tagged , ,

Rivers in the Sky: How Deforestation Is Affecting Global Water Cycles

A growing body of evidence indicates that the continuing destruction of tropical forests is disrupting the movement of water in the atmosphere, causing major shifts in precipitation that could lead to drought in key agricultural areas in China, India, and … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Water | Tagged ,

Stark Evidence: A Warmer World Is Sparking More and Bigger Wildfires

The increase in forest fires, seen this summer from North America to the Mediterranean to Siberia, is directly linked to climate change, scientists say. And as the world continues to warm, there will be a greater risk for fires on … Continue reading

Posted in Climate change, Wildfires | Tagged ,

Sparing vs Sharing: The Great Debate Over How to Protect Nature

What is the best way to save nature – to cordon off areas for parks and open space or to integrate conservation measures on working lands? Recent research makes a case for each of these approaches and has reignited a … Continue reading

Posted in Nature | Tagged

Native Knowledge: What Ecologists Are Learning from Indigenous People

From Alaska to Australia, scientists are turning to the knowledge of traditional people for a deeper understanding of the natural world. What they are learning is helping them discover more about everything from melting Arctic ice, to protecting fish stocks, … Continue reading

Posted in Ecology, Indigenous knowledge | Tagged ,

On Nature, Human Nature, and the Wealth of the Wilderness

“After you have exhausted what there is in business, politics, conviviality, love, and so on — have found that none of these finally satisfy, or permanently wear — what remains?” Walt Whitman asked in contemplating what makes life worth living, … Continue reading

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How the Antarctic Circumpolar Current helps keep Antarctica frozen

The Antarctic Circumpolar Current, or ACC, is the strongest ocean current on our planet. It extends from the sea surface to the bottom of the ocean, and encircles Antarctica. It is vital for Earth’s health because it keeps Antarctica cool … Continue reading

Posted in Antarctic, Sea-level | Tagged ,

Freeing Towns From the Tyranny of the Automobile

What do we mean when we say that a city is “healthy”? Do we mean that it’s cleaner, safer, and less polluted than others? That its economy is booming? That it spends its taxpayers’ money wisely, on projects that benefit … Continue reading

Posted in City, Walk | Tagged ,